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Mar 25, 2004

Comments

1.

Gonzalo has candid shots of several of the academic folks on our blogroll [link].

Perhaps one of these days we'll all be Flikr/JoiIto with picture links...

2.

Just got back from the first Serious Games Summit at the GDC...overall a great turnout for the 2-day event, with several interesting presentations and viewpoints. The biggest issues seemed to be:
Should non-entertainment games be fun? The name 'serious games' may indicate no, but yes, they probably should be fun.
Choice quote "Anyone who questions the relationship between games and learning doesn't know a thing about either" - Chris Crawford.
Another issue that was raised a few times was assessment in games. Is this good or bad? Both sides were argued.
Overall, most time spent was identifying problems or obstacles for using games in non-entertainment ways (education/training/etc).

One of the more comical moments came from Kurt Squire (although it appeared only 25% of the audience found it entertaining): If you're a good gamer, what is the first thing you do when someone hands you a gun in a game? Shoot the person who gave it to you!
A good point in terms of exploring the rules of a game, exploratory learning, and learning how the rules of a game can and can't be manipulated (the quake rocket jump strategy also came up along these lines).

A great two days in San Jose...I wish I could have stuck around another day to at least check out the Expo Floor and play with some toys.
-Bart

3.

I just got back and I'm starting to post some comments at Water Cooler Games. I'll add some comments on the Serious Games Summit tomorrow. It was a good two days, but I think Gonzalo and I felt very alone as "rhetorical gamers." More on that in my forthcoming posts.

Greg -- the pics are fun, aren't they? Gonzalo's got lots more. That said, having been to a few conferences recently with the blogger A-lists, and even though I count some of them as my friends, I found the live blogging/IRCing/photoblogging at those events really, really disruptive.

4.

Ian > I found the live blogging/IRCing/photoblogging at those events really, really disruptive.

There's a point. Blogging between sessions is fine, but I’ve been to events where the entire back row (in a small room) is tapping away like mad and (this might be jet lag speaking) sometimes it drives me nuts.

5.

REN>Blogging between sessions is fine, but I’ve been to events where the entire back row (in a small room) is tapping away like mad and (this might be jet lag speaking) sometimes it drives me nuts

I frequently deliver lectures where over half the students are using laptops the whole time I speak. Worse, they use the fact that the teaching rooms are all wireless hotspots for the campus intranet to send one another IMs, so the typing is just as likely to be gossip as notes.

I finally had to draw the line when I heard one one student saying he'd set up a CounterStrike server in his bedroom. Mice are quieter than keyboards, but still! Nobody plays games during my lectures unless I tell them to!

Richard

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