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Feb 16, 2004

Comments

1.

I forgot to link to Ross Mayfield's review over at Many-to-Many.

2.

San Diego was a fine, fine day, good times indeed. I was struck at how much time these topics can take up. Hands start raising after about three minutes of intro, and there's never enough time to really discuss any of the points being raised. The 45 minutes is over in a heartbeat.

On the broader point: the technology does have legs beyond the gaming area. I keep imagining my mother-in-law using avatar technology to stay in touch with her grandchildren. That's a great app if anyone can make it happen. But for it to go mainstream, it can't have more buttons than a TV. Tall order.

3.

" But for it to go mainstream, it can't have more buttons than a TV. Tall order."

My last two TV remotes - AT&T Digital Cable and DirecTV - both had, essentially, a Directional Pad in the middle for navigating the Listings and menus - using this for movement where necessary/desirable and a headset like XBoxLive for voice chat, hooked up to a TV, even the most technophobic, VR/gaming ignorant of the pre-baby-boomers should have no problems navigating a virtual environment. Tack on features like inserting your own picture on the avatar a la Tony Hawk UnderGround or more interactively the PS2's EyeToy and you've got a game/communication device with a lot more legs than a Video Phone or a Webcam.
Plus, when the grandkids come to visit, they can hop down to the store and rent a game for your glorified videophone/gamesystem.

All the pieces are there - you wouldn't even have to manufacture hardware - you'd just need to get a publisher to back you while you gather the team to combine your game system of choice's features into a virtual meeting place complete with photo-accurate avatars, live video and audio, and a simple control sysem/gui.

4.

"But it turns out play is about people, not places. In fact, play is often about building things [including places] collaboratively."

Absolutely! Sounds like this would have been a great conference to attend.

5.

It was a great conference to attend. And thanks for the link!

Flickr is still in its first 'preview release' (and there will be two more of those). After that, it'll get interesting :)

6.

Ok, I'm trying really hard to get Flikr. Somebody help me: why do I want to share media with friends and family live and online?

I mean, it seems cool, and the Flash app itself is clearly an engineering marvel, but it's so high concept... Stewart or someone else, help me understand who would use this and why? Or is it just an experiment not meant for mass market consumption?

(I hope I'm not the only one who has to ask)

7.

Ian> I mean, it seems cool, and the Flash app itself is clearly an engineering marvel, but it's so high concept... Stewart or someone else, help me understand who would use this and why? Or is it just an experiment not meant for mass market consumption?

Well, you might not have got it Ian, but it took less than a year for Yahoo to figure it out. ;-)

http://www.corante.com/many/archives/2005/03/20/flickr_yahoo.php

Congrats, Stewart! Couldn't happen to a nicer company...

p.s.

Only downside is that a certain high-concept virtual world is on ice. :-|

http://www.gne.net/

8.

greglas> Well, you might not have got it Ian, but it took less than a year for Yahoo to figure it out.

Much less than a year. The acquisition dance takes many months. [And boy, are my feet tired!] :-)

The thing Ian missed is how community (specifically social incentive) is a special hook for gathering metadata. Stewart learned this because of his experience with Game Never Ending.

The lesson of the best of AC's allegiance system applied to photo tagging. Great Stuff.

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