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Sep 29, 2007

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Comments

1.

This is great Nate, but a spell check would have made it even better. ;D

2.

Its me, I'm the DMX in the quote.

3.

> spell check
> "DMX"

-
Thanks, feedback of all flavors is useful. I'd like to pull this (running) series of Eve-0nline primer posts into into a consolidated (and updated) online reference document.

4.

In one of those GameShack articles on Eve, there was a comment that I really liked suggesting that with the narratives Eve provokes, someone really needs to sit down and build a real history of the game.

Honestly, a well written book on the history of the in-game drama would be a fantastic read, both for the punters, but those who take an academic interest in the little histories of in-game worlds.

5.

There is no one "history", though. A lot of what happens is perceptions and shadows, a lot of what happens is influenced by deals which never rise into visibility and it's not that uncommon for both sides to consider a particular campaign a strategic win or loss.

As someone who's been in corps on both sides of several wars (not at the same time, I'm no spy..), the perspective and history told is completely different.

6.

Well, history's written by the victors; that's nothing new. And it doesn't have to be the authoritative be-all-end-all history; a "he-said they had a logistical failure, she-said a spy stole the POS fuel" sort of thing would be interesting. It probably would be better to wait until Eve is more or less over, though, since there's probably still spies in deep cover or diplomats with secret agreements who would have interesting stories to tell after all the shooting stops for good.

7.

About FCs (Fleet commanders) ...

To have competent commanders is the MOST important asset you have in EVE alliance gaming. And you need REAL WORLD skills. A calm teamspeak presence, a sound knowledge of the game, multitasking ability, instinct, valor ....

You can have characters with all the right in-game skills, implants, command ships and warfare link modules, upgrading the whole fleet with "buffs" ... and they will still be useless if there is an incompetent and/or inexperienced player behind the keyboard.

A wrong decision by a commander in EVE in a critical battle (e.g. FAT, 9-9, 66- etc.) will (has :-) cost thousands of ships, dozens of capital ships, maybe even a supercapital ship. And with it pilot clones, implants and ship fittings ... for a total value of several hundred billion ISK. You can buy a Ferrari in RL if you ebay that amount of money.

I dont know another MMORPG out there with such a massive scale of conflict and such a pressure on its PvP leaders.

Have fun

8.

Considering I've seen FC's literally melt down in tears from a single bad decision, yeah. Its a bit of a heavy task.

That said, one of the best FC's I've seen was a 3 week old newbie, that we let FC for bit of a lark. The guy had us mop the floor with a really large opponent fleet that ambushed us. Turned out the guy was in real life some sort of Army dude, and he reckoned it was pretty much the same decision making thing, with the added bonus that ship losses are not real casualtys

9.

That said, Teamspeak has Something to do with it.

Theres something about some people who's voices just command respect. And its hard to pin it down. For some reason Brit guys tend to have good voices for it. My two favorite FC's, one guy has a voice almost like some sort of SciFi Dr Who bad guy, and the other is notorious for being drunk as hell and just whipping people into a kill frenzy for a suicide attack on an enemy fleet or whatever. Both of them its in the voice, but for different reasons.

Can't pin down what it is, but I'm going to take a guess and say its confidence and swagger.

10.

Its confidence. Coolness under pressure.

An FC may order you to jump into a heavily entrenched enemy (= jumping into a new EVE system with the enemy waiting and you know that you will be watching a black screen for a long time until the system loads and the lag gods favor you). Its essentially a suicide mission. But there is such calmness in his/her voice that you do it anyway. Because you know that the FC may get important information by sacrificing your ship (enemy ships from killmail e.g.) ... information that allow him to win the overall battle. Or he KNOWS that a part of his fleet will be lagged out and will end as flaming wrecks, but its a price he is willing to pay to achieve the overall objective.

Faith in a FC is the glue that drives EVE PvP. That and superior tactics allows small gangs to beat much larger forces.

But even if the FC is a drunken roaring stand up comedian on the Teamspeak, you just might have so much fun being in his fleet that the complete loss of a whole gang at the end of a crazy killing spree is irrelevant when compared to the sheer fun you had in those hours.

Have fun

11.

This is fascinating stuff, Eve seems to be a good barometer of human fancy and ability online at present it seems. The developers of Beyond Protocol, a SciFi MMORTS in closed Beta atm, are attempting this on a scale atm and this article is proving valuable hindsight for us in the community. Do you think that scaling it all up on the PvP level, with MMORTS, will produce the same or similar dynamics, or something wildly different?

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